Electric Scooters in Dallas - How to Ride Street Legal Under New City Laws

Daniel Foley
Written By: Daniel Foley
Updated on: 6/21/2024
Published on: 5/23/2024

Dallas e-scooter program demystified!

Even if you ride a lightweight electric scooter built purely for the daily urban commute - you may not be allowed to ride on the sidewalk or in the local park.

Particularly if you live and commute in Dallas. When city officials relaunched its electric scooter program in May 2023, a whole bunch of new laws also came into force.

Violating the new rules could cost you up to $200 in a citation.

If you're up for riding an electric scooter to work - and grabbing a piece of affordable, mobility action - but confused about where you can now actually ride ...

In this article, we'll give you the lowdown on what you need to know, including slow-ride zones, no-ride zones, and the various speed limits.

Let's go ...

Riding electric scooters on Dallas streets

From upstate to downtown Dallas, electric scooter riders are back on the streets.

Which is good news if you're looking for a lightweight electric scooter to zip to work every day. And not racing performance scooters around public parks.

The rules have changed, and all scooter riders need to know how to ride legally throughout the city of Dallas.

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Official relaunch of e scooter program

E scooters were originally banned in the city of Dallas in September 2020. This was because of public safety concerns, mostly over exceeding speed limits and reckless riding.

But two years later, Dallas city officials approved a new code for riding e scooters, which allowed them back on the streets in May 2023.

Dallas city

Dallas city code - what it says

Basically, from now on, it's the code which tells you where and how you can legally ride and park your electric scooter.

Under the Dallas City Code (Restrictions on the use of Motor Assisted Scooters and Electric Bicycles) Section 28-41.1.1

City wide speed limit

The Dallas department responsible for city transportation has now imposed a city wide speed limit on riding electric scooters of:

  • 32.1 km/h (20 mph)

Plus, the Dallas city code also introduces 2 new riding zones, each with its own separate speed limits and restrictions:

  • No Ride Zones
  • Slow Ride Zones

No Scooters Allowed

No Ride Zones

These are defined as areas where you can't ride your e scooter:

  • Roads with a maximum speed limit of 56 km/h (35 mph) or higher.

Other No Ride zones where you're also not allowed to ride your e scooter are:

  • Sidewalks - a paved pedestrian route running alongside a road.
  • Trails - a footpath, hiking route or unpaved route in a natural area, not intended for use by a motor vehicle.
  • Parks - urban green spaces set aside for public recreation, such as Klyde Warren Park and the Katy Trail. There are more than 30 "No Ride" zones in the Lake Highlands and Lakewood areas, including White Rock Lake, Olive Shapiro Park, Flag Pole Hill Park, Norbuck Park and Tenison Park
  • Plazas - an open, public area, including public spaces in front of buildings or stores.

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Under the new code, you must carry your scooter when you reach the above areas.

Slow Ride Zones

These are defined as:

  • Areas with a speed limit reduced to 16 km/h (10 mph).

This is because you're entering:

  • Areas with high pedestrian traffic - or -
  • Specific safety restrictions are necessary.

Slow Ride zones are mostly found in downtown Dallas, in locations such as Deep Ellum, Bishop Arts district, the West End, and the Ronald Kirk Pedestrian Bridge.

IMPORTANT: A Slow Ride Zone has also not been fixed. However, exactly where and when an area or route becomes a slow ride zone is usually determined by traffic conditions at any given moment in time.

You should check out the latest traffic information in real time on a Dallas city interactive map. You should also be notified when you approach both the 'No Ride' and 'Slow Ride' zones.

E scooter and bike parking

Parking your electric scooter in Dallas

Oftentimes, you'll be riding your scooter to and from your destination, like on a daily commute to your place of work. The only time you would likely need to stop is to walk up or down a bunch of steps to the subway. A lightweight electric scooter is a standard must-have if you're definitely a, "don't stop me now" urban commuter.

But what happens if you do need to stop and park up when picking up groceries, going for a bite to eat or meeting up with your buddies or family?

Under the Dallas City Code (Restrictions on the use of Motor Assisted Scooters and Electric Bicycles) Section 28-41.1.1

What you CAN do

You are allowed to legally park an electric scooter (or e bike), which must be in a standing, upright position:

On concrete or other non-porous surface.

In a space specifically reserved for the parking of e scooters or e bikes.

In a 'pedestrian' zone - and fully contained in an area between the curb and sidewalk which separates pedestrians from moving vehicle traffic.

Secured to a bicycle rack - with a locking mechanism.

What you CAN'T do

You are NOT allowed to legally park an electric scooter or e-bike:

Within 3 meters (10 feet) of an intersection or crosswalk - unless the area is reserved for the parking of e-scooters.

On a roadway - unless the area is reserved for the parking of e-scooters.

On a sidewalk or public path - which would obstruct traffic and prevent free passage.

Along a block face where the combined width of the sidewalk and area between the curb and sidewalk is less than 2.4 meters (eight feet).

In a space reserved as a motor vehicle parking or loading space or between two vehicle parking spaces.

Within, against, or adjacent to a public transit shelter or stop, which restricts use by pedestrians who are waiting for public transportation.

In a manner that obstructs fire hydrants, building access/exits, and vehicle driveways.

On any private property without permission of the property owner.

In a public park, square or open space unless reserved for parking e scooters or ebikes.

City of Dallas Code Compliance Services

Summary: how to avoid breaking the city code when riding an electric scooter in Dallas

Previously, an increasing number of accidents and injuries involved electric scooters. The new city rules for electric scooter riders are aimed at reducing speed and protecting both pedestrians and riders.

The rules are actually straightforward and should be no real hassle to follow.

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Under the new Code, section 28-41.1.1

You will be committing an offense if you ride an electric scooter:

1. On any sidewalk within the city

2. At a speed greater than:

  • 32.1 km/h (20 mph)
  • Speed limit set in a specific slow ride zone
  • Speed limit signposted on a public street or trail

3. In a public park, public square or open space

4. On the state fair grounds during the State Fair of Texas

You will also be breaking the city code if you:

Transport any passenger on your e scooter (or ebike) in a public area within the city - unless your scooter is equipped with a seat and a set of foot rests for the passenger.

Fail to give right-of-way to any pedestrian - while riding your electric scooter.

Ride your scooter on a prohibited trail - or during the hours riding is prohibited on the trail.

Ride your scooter in a public area in a manner contrary to the intended use of the space.

Dallas Police Dept badge

What happens if I break the rules?

An offense committed under section 28-41.1.1 is punishable by a fine of up to $200. Plus, you can also be issued a citation by a parking enforcement officer.

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What's the best advice for staying safe and riding street legal in Dallas?

Apart from not carrying a passenger on your deck, observing all access restrictions and speed limits within all types of riding zones, the Dallas code also instructs:

All riders should be wearing helmets - and ensure they are properly attached with chin straps securely fastened and tightened.

Every electric scooter and e bike must be equipped with:

  • Headlight - emitting a white light visible at a distance of not less than 1.52 meters (500 feet)
  • Rear red reflector - visible from a distance of not less than 1.82 meters (600 feet)

Riding e scooters in daylight and at dusk

In a nutshell

If you're definitely up for beating out the daily commute in Dallas on a zippy, lightweight electric scooter, you have to:

Know where you're riding

The Dallas area has a mix of flat roads and light hill climbs. Always be aware of the type of terrain you intend to ride. Be aware of any and all restrictions, and always adjust your speed to the legal limit and traffic conditions.

Obey the traffic rules

In particular, always signal your intention to turn left or right, always maneuver with awareness of others, and always use bike lanes where available.

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Riding at night or in reduced daylight

Ensure your scooter battery is fully charged so you're able to always switch on your scooter lights. You should always wear high visibility, reflective clothing and helmet.

Find out more about Electric Scooter Regulations where you live or work

Grab yourself a lightweight electric scooter for fast, affordable Dallas commuting today!

Sign up HERE to the Unagi All-Access Subscription Program


Daniel Foley
Daniel Foley

Daniel tests all the latest e-scooters and currently enjoys the Unagi Voyager as a daily driver for it's light weight, good range, and stylish look.

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